2015-06-11 Energy Week

Please note that this post is being developed.

Thursday, June 4:

  • There will be no US-style shale gas revolution in Europe, the president of the International Gas Union told BBC. “You cannot duplicate [the US experience] in Europe,” he said. “Politicians are hesitating to accept shale development.” The US has experienced low gas prices because of fracking. [Hellenic Shipping News Worldwide]
  • ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson recently let the world know that global warming or not, his company will keep on doing business as usual. However, one of the global petroleum industry’s single biggest customers is ready for a change of air. The US Army intends to wean itself from petroleum products. [CleanTechnica]

Friday, June 5:

  • A study by the US DOE found that a proposed $1.2 billion power transmission line under Lake Champlain would have very little effect on the surrounding environment. The proposed New England Clean Power Link is a project designed by TDI New England to bring Canadian electricity to the New England market. [Vermont Public Radio]

Light house in Lake Champlain at dusk, as seen from Burlington Vermont. Photo by Nagaraju.ramanna. Wikimedia Commons.

  • The value of Europe’s five biggest energy utilities dropped €100 billion ($113 billion) between 2008 and 2013, in part because of a dogged preference for coal over clean power investments, a new report says. EON, RWE, GDF Suez, EDF and Enel collectively lost 37% of their share value in the period. [The Guardian]
  • Advanced Microgrid Solutions has selected Tesla as the primary technology provider for its utility-scale energy storage projects. AMS will install up to 500 MWh of Tesla batteries in its energy storage projects. AMS also signed an agreement with Black & Veatch for engineering and construction services. [Your Renewable News]
  • A proposal to install over floating wind turbines offshore of Oahu, Hawaii’s most populous island, could generate 30% of the island’s energy needs according to a report from Fusion. The state produces the bulk of its power from imported oil. The state legislature has passed a 100% by 2045 renewables mandate. [Utility Dive]

Saturday, June 6:

  • One corner of the Whitcomb Farm in Essex Junction, Vermont now has 12,000 solar panels generating electricity on it. The system was built by New Jersey developer PSEG. Its 3.6-MW capacity makes it the largest solar system in the state. It will supply annual needs of about 600 households. [WPTZ The Champlain Valley]
  • Over 30 states are at least halfway toward meeting early CO2 emissions targets called for by the US EPA’s proposed regulations for existing power plants, according to a study released by the Union of Concerned Scientists. Of those states, 14 can meet the 2020 interim target based on prior actions. [Argus Media]

Sunday, June 7:

  • Hydro Tasmania is bracing for the effects of a looming El Nino. Drier than normal conditions have been blamed for lower hydro generation in other Australian states, while the weather bureau warns a strengthening El Nino in the Pacific should bring below average rainfall for south-eastern Australia. [Perth Now]

Hydro Tasmania’s Gordon Dam on Lake Gordon in the South-West of Tasmania. Picture: Peter Mathew/Hydro Tasmania.

  • Africa can boost its capacity to generate power, economic growth, and jobs, without precipitating catastrophic climate change, argues Kofi Annan. The Africa Progress Panel, which he heads categorically rejects the idea that Africa has to choose between growth and low-carbon development. [Front Page Africa]
  • Right at this very moment 621 million Africans, two-thirds of the continent’s population, live without electricity. A kettle boiled twice a day in the United Kingdom uses five times as much electricity as someone in Mali uses in a year. With current trends, the lack of power will last until long after 2030. [Times of Oman]

Monday, June 8:

  • Increased capacity and strong winds saw Scottish wind power generation rise 83% year-on-year last month, setting a record for May. The turbines generated enough for 101% of Scottish households. WWF Scotland said on Monday as it called on the UK government to rethink its plans to curb onshore wind. [SeeNews Renewables]

Wind park in Scotland. Author: Ian Dick. License: Creative Commons, Attribution 2.0 Generic.

  • South Korea has axed plans to build four coal-fired power plants and will boost its nuclear reactor fleet by two more units, as it looks to increase the share of nuclear and gas in power generation and cut reliance on coal. The new plans would take the number of planned nuclear reactors to 36 by 2029. [Economic Times]
  • SunEdison Inc. plans to invest $15 billion in India by 2022, a top executive said, as the renewable-energy company seeks to deepen in its foothold in a country where power producers have struggled to meet demand. The company plans to install a total of 15 GW of wind and solar power capacity in India. [MarketWatch]
  • Three large shipping containers in an industrial park in Boothbay, Maine have batteries storing enough electricity to run 100 homes for a day, New England’s first utility-scale electricity storage system. They are part of a pilot program aimed at meeting peak demand at a fraction of the cost of new transmission lines. [Press Herald]

Tuesday, June 9:

  • The top seven industrialized countries (G7), whose carbon dioxide emissions total 25% of the world’s output, decided at a meeting in Germany today to phase out their use of fossil fuels by the end of this century. It’s a breakthrough move on climate change and a strong signal to the rest of the countries in the world. [CleanTechnica]
  • Hawai’i is now the first state in the nation to adopt a 100% renewable energy requirement for electricity generation, as Governor David Ige signed the measure into law. That goal is to be achieved by 2045. Representative Chris Lee introduced the measure partly as a step to reduce electricity costs. [Hawaii Public Radio-HPR2]
  • A Republican entrepreneur is putting a whopping $175 million behind a campaign whose message will have some party stalwarts seeing red: The GOP needs to deal with climate change. Among Republican presidential candidates, only Lindsey Graham admits to believing human activity causes climate change. [Politico]
  • Researchers at Stanford University and UC Berkeley have outlined how each of the 50 states can achieve a complete transition to renewable power by 2050. The plans call for aggressive changes to both infrastructure and the ways we currently consume energy, but also show conversions that are economically possible. [Stanford University News]

Wednesday, June 10:

  • The top seven industrialized countries (G7), whose carbon dioxide emissions total 25% of the world’s output, decided at a meeting in Germany today to phase out their use of fossil fuels by the end of this century. It’s a breakthrough move on climate change and a strong signal to the rest of the countries in the world. [CleanTechnica]
  • Hawai’i is now the first state in the nation to adopt a 100% renewable energy requirement for electricity generation, as Governor David Ige signed the measure into law. That goal is to be achieved by 2045. Representative Chris Lee introduced the measure partly as a step to reduce electricity costs. [Hawaii Public Radio-HPR2]
  • A Republican entrepreneur is putting a whopping $175 million behind a campaign whose message will have some party stalwarts seeing red: The GOP needs to deal with climate change. Among Republican presidential candidates, only Lindsey Graham admits to believing human activity causes climate change. [Politico]
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